Homework 1, due September 4, 1013.

Due at the beginning of class on Wednesday, September 4, 2013.
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goodwine
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Homework 1, due September 4, 1013.

Post by goodwine »

Reading: Chapter 1 from the course text. Normally the assigned reading will closely track what we are doing in class. However, the material in Chapter 1 is of a different nature: all of it is important but some is background and some will be necessary at different times throughout the course and not all of it will seem to be connected to the next couple lectures. Again, normally this isn't the case and reading and lectures will usually closely track each other.

Exercises: 1.20, 1.21, 1.23 and 1.28 from the course text. If you need to "write a computer program to determine and approximate numerical solution" using ode45() in Matlab (or lsode() in octave) are acceptable for this assignment.
Bill Goodwine, 376 Fitzpatrick
goodwine
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Problem 1.28

Post by goodwine »

Someone asked me:
For question 1.28 in the first homework set, what do you want us to turn in? Paper(s) with the equations of motion, computer code, and a graph? Or just one or two of those things? Also, what are you expecting us to write the code in? Is MATLAB ok?
I would add to that list of things a description of your interpretation of your solution. Matlab is ok for this problem.
Bill Goodwine, 376 Fitzpatrick
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Problem 1.28

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Someone asked me:
While working on Problem 1.28 (the programming question with a system of two springs and a suspended block), I was able to determine a second order differential equation to describe the change in x. I was able to solve that equation with ode45() and use the results to calculate y(t).

Is this an acceptable method of solving this problem, or do I need to also find and solve a second order diff. eq. for y? If so, how do I relate the acceleration of y to the forces acting on it if there is no mass at y0?
If your first principle analysis provides one differential equation for x and an algebraic equation for y, then you don't have to do any extra work to force y to be a differential equation. Whatever the easiest formulation for you is the best way to go unless I directly say otherwise.
Bill Goodwine, 376 Fitzpatrick
tnguye21

Re: Homework 1, due September 4, 1013.

Post by tnguye21 »

For problem 1.20, do we have to write specific units like kg or seconds to describe each variable?
goodwine
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Re: Homework 1, due September 4, 1013.

Post by goodwine »

tnguye21 wrote:For problem 1.20, do we have to write specific units like kg or seconds to describe each variable?
You can either use SI units or just go generic like "mass/time". The former is probably easier.
Bill Goodwine, 376 Fitzpatrick
klalka

Re: Homework 1, due September 4, 1013.

Post by klalka »

For Problem 1.23, what do the pictures with the mechanisms labeled "b" represent?
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Re: Homework 1, due September 4, 1013.

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klalka wrote:For Problem 1.23, what do the pictures with the mechanisms labeled "b" represent?
That's a damper. It's described in Chapter 1.
Bill Goodwine, 376 Fitzpatrick
jkearns

Re: Homework 1, due September 4, 1013.

Post by jkearns »

For Problem 1.20, is a second order differential equation, one that represents the acceleration of the rope, sufficient to answer the problem statement? As in, is an equation for acceleration sufficient to satisfy the prompt for "an equation of motion?"
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Re: Homework 1, due September 4, 1013.

Post by goodwine »

jkearns wrote:For Problem 1.20, is a second order differential equation, one that represents the acceleration of the rope, sufficient to answer the problem statement? As in, is an equation for acceleration sufficient to satisfy the prompt for "an equation of motion?"
Yes.
Bill Goodwine, 376 Fitzpatrick
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