Homework 6

Due at the beginning of class on October 7, 2015.
Post Reply
goodwine
Site Admin
Posts: 1596
Joined: Tue Aug 24, 2004 4:54 pm
Location: 376 Fitzpatrick
Contact:

Homework 6

Post by goodwine »

Reading: Chapter 4.

Exercises: 4.3, 4.4, 4.6, 4.7, 4.9, 4.12, 4.14 and 4.15.

In 4.6, you do not have to write a computer program, i.e., ignore the sentence starting with "Demonstrate whether..."
Bill Goodwine, 376 Fitzpatrick
ldillon1

Re: Homework 6

Post by ldillon1 »

For 4.3, do we consider the force due to gravity as well?
goodwine
Site Admin
Posts: 1596
Joined: Tue Aug 24, 2004 4:54 pm
Location: 376 Fitzpatrick
Contact:

Re: Homework 6

Post by goodwine »

ldillon1 wrote:For 4.3, do we consider the force due to gravity as well?
No, see the note at the beginning of the exercises. Also problem 4.9 shows you don't have to ever consider it in these types of problems as long as you define x=0 in the right manner.
Bill Goodwine, 376 Fitzpatrick
bkenned7

Re: Homework 6

Post by bkenned7 »

So, in 4.9, part 2 shows how defining equilibrium correctly allows you to ignore gravity, correct?
Can gravity be neglected in part 1 of 4.9 as well?
kpulliam

Re: Homework 6

Post by kpulliam »

For question 4.9, what does it mean when it says "determine the equation of motion?" Does it want us to solve for x or just leave it as a diff eq?
tbest

Re: Homework 6

Post by tbest »

Also for question 4.9, do we need to solve for the entire general solution, or can we concentrate on the steady state part of the equation?
goodwine
Site Admin
Posts: 1596
Joined: Tue Aug 24, 2004 4:54 pm
Location: 376 Fitzpatrick
Contact:

Re: Homework 6

Post by goodwine »

bkenned7 wrote:So, in 4.9, part 2 shows how defining equilibrium correctly allows you to ignore gravity, correct?
Can gravity be neglected in part 1 of 4.9 as well?
Yes to the first part, but no to the second because it's in comparing the two that allows you going forward to ignore gravity.
Bill Goodwine, 376 Fitzpatrick
goodwine
Site Admin
Posts: 1596
Joined: Tue Aug 24, 2004 4:54 pm
Location: 376 Fitzpatrick
Contact:

Re: Homework 6

Post by goodwine »

kpulliam wrote:For question 4.9, what does it mean when it says "determine the equation of motion?" Does it want us to solve for x or just leave it as a diff eq?
Find the differential equations. If it doesn't say to solve it, you don't have to solve it.
Bill Goodwine, 376 Fitzpatrick
goodwine
Site Admin
Posts: 1596
Joined: Tue Aug 24, 2004 4:54 pm
Location: 376 Fitzpatrick
Contact:

Re: Homework 6

Post by goodwine »

tbest wrote:Also for question 4.9, do we need to solve for the entire general solution, or can we concentrate on the steady state part of the equation?
You only need to find the equation, not solve it. But solving this specific equation should be easy anyway if you have already done so.
Bill Goodwine, 376 Fitzpatrick
goodwine
Site Admin
Posts: 1596
Joined: Tue Aug 24, 2004 4:54 pm
Location: 376 Fitzpatrick
Contact:

Re: Homework 6

Post by goodwine »

Someone asked me:
For problem 4.3 on the latest homework, do you expect us to completely re-derive the answer to the equation in the method that you did in class, or do you expect us to be intuitively able to make changes to the solution that we found in order to reflect the different force acting upon the system? Or should we solve it without converting to the constants that we have been using lately in class?
Completely re-derive it mathematically. There are enough steps in there that people find confusing, that you need to go through it all. You also do need to convert the to the constants because it asks you to plot the magnitude and phase vs frequency ratio, and it's not possible to do that without that conversion.
Bill Goodwine, 376 Fitzpatrick
goodwine
Site Admin
Posts: 1596
Joined: Tue Aug 24, 2004 4:54 pm
Location: 376 Fitzpatrick
Contact:

Re: Homework 6

Post by goodwine »

Someone asked me:
I'm a bit confused about the wording of some of the questions for Problem Set 6. Does "Determine a good approximation" mean write out an equation for M similar to what we did in part 3 of problem 4.3, or does it mean draw a graph approximating the value of M for different omega values, or both of these things? (This is particularly a question for Problems 4.4 and 4.7).
Neither. It means use the graphs to determine an answer like x = 13 cos(5 t + 2) where the numbers came from the graphs (that's the only approximate part, you can't find exact values from graphs).
Bill Goodwine, 376 Fitzpatrick
colsen3

Re: Homework 6

Post by colsen3 »

Does steady state imply that w=wn?
goodwine
Site Admin
Posts: 1596
Joined: Tue Aug 24, 2004 4:54 pm
Location: 376 Fitzpatrick
Contact:

Re: Homework 6

Post by goodwine »

colsen3 wrote:Does steady state imply that w=wn?
No, it implies that time is large. If there is damping the homogeneous solution will be close to zero.
Bill Goodwine, 376 Fitzpatrick
colsen3

Re: Homework 6

Post by colsen3 »

Also, is displacement transmissibility the same as force transmissibilty?
colsen3

Re: Homework 6

Post by colsen3 »

goodwine wrote:
colsen3 wrote:Does steady state imply that w=wn?
No, it implies that time is large. If there is damping the homogeneous solution will be close to zero.
But in problem 4.12 I think we are supposed to substitute using wn=sqrt(k/m) to solve for k to manipulate the equation . But we originally have w and not wn.
goodwine
Site Admin
Posts: 1596
Joined: Tue Aug 24, 2004 4:54 pm
Location: 376 Fitzpatrick
Contact:

Re: Homework 6

Post by goodwine »

colsen3 wrote:
goodwine wrote:
colsen3 wrote:Does steady state imply that w=wn?
No, it implies that time is large. If there is damping the homogeneous solution will be close to zero.
But in problem 4.12 I think we are supposed to substitute using wn=sqrt(k/m) to solve for k to manipulate the equation . But we originally have w and not wn.
There are lots of wn's inside M_f.
Bill Goodwine, 376 Fitzpatrick
Jfox10

Re: Homework 6

Post by Jfox10 »

For problem 4.15, do we need to assume initial conditions in order to eliminate the c1 and c2 that are found when calculating position function (as part of getting to the energy function), or do they end up playing an insignificant role?
goodwine
Site Admin
Posts: 1596
Joined: Tue Aug 24, 2004 4:54 pm
Location: 376 Fitzpatrick
Contact:

Re: Homework 6

Post by goodwine »

Jfox10 wrote:For problem 4.15, do we need to assume initial conditions in order to eliminate the c1 and c2 that are found when calculating position function (as part of getting to the energy function), or do they end up playing an insignificant role?
Yes, but I would suggest choosing the initial conditions such that c1 and c2 are both zero.
Bill Goodwine, 376 Fitzpatrick
Post Reply

Return to “AME 30314, Homework 6”