Week 1: September 3 - 7

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goodwine
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Week 1: September 3 - 7

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Post your seminar summary reports below.
Bill Goodwine, 376 Fitzpatrick
goodwine
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Joined: Tue Aug 24, 2004 4:54 pm
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Setton, Cartilage

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SPEAKER: Lori A. Setton, Ph.D., Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Surgery, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina
TOPIC: Rational Approach to the Design of Hydrogels for Cartilage Repair
DATE: Tuesday, September 4, 2007
TIME: 3:30 p.m.
PLACE: 138 DeBartolo Hall

This talk focused on the design and analysis of elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) used for the repair of damaged cartilage. Since cartilage serves mechanical functions as well as biological functions, designing materials to either replace or facilitate repair of damaged cartilage is challenging. The ELPs in this talk were genetically engineered to have desirable cross-linking characteristics, which is necessary for them to have the appropriate mechanical properties. In addition to discussing the properties of the materials, an interesting feature of this talk was the use of artificial neural networks to classify these materials in terms of their desirable properties. The paper "A Two-Step Chondrocyte Recovery System Based on Thermally Sensitive Elastin-Like Polypeptide Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering," by Betre, Chilkoti and Setton, describes the tissue engineering strategy in more detail. This paper outlines results directed toward using chondrocytes in monolayer that are encapsulated in the thermally sensitive ELP for 10 days, and then cultured on inserts for four weeks, which resulted in the generation of tissue that resembled native articular cartilage in appearance and biochemical composition. This is promising in that it suggests approaches to generate cartilage for repair in vivo.

In the broader context, Dr. Setton's work also includes testing and evaluation methods for cartilage. In "Compressive Properties of Mouse Articular Cartilage Determined in a Novel Micro-Indentation Test Method and Biphasic Finite Element Model," by Cao, youn, Guilak and Setton a micro-indentation method was developed that is useful to test the mechanical properties of cartilage in mice. Testing in mice is important since it is desirable that evaluation of therapies for diseases such as osteoarthritis be carried out in animals prior to human trials. In this paper a "differential evolution" algorithm, which is a type of genetic algorithm, is utilized in order to facilitate matching finite element model simulation data to the experimental data. This is useful so that finite element models that are appropriately calibrated can be used to predict mechanical properties of cartilage and cartilage repair materials.
Bill Goodwine, 376 Fitzpatrick
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